Today is the New Year 7250

Updated: Mar 26



As of sunrise today, Wednesday, March 24, 2021 in the pagan Roman Gregorian calendar, it is the New Year 7,250. How do I know this? It's simply math. The oldest text-witnesses of the Thorah (i.e. Dead Sea Scrolls, Septuagint) tell us that the number of years from the first year of creation, which was the year Adam was made, down to the year of the death of Mashah (Moses), the same year Mashah finished writing the Thorah, was a span of 3,773 years. This is the number years obtained by adding up all of the chronological figures stated in Thorah from Adam to the death of Mashah. The period from the death of Mashah to the siege of Yaroshalam (Jerusalem) by the Neo-Babylonians in 589 BC was a span of 868 years. Add 868 years to 3,773 years and we get 4,641 from the first year of creation to the siege of Yaroshalam by the Neo-Babylonians. From the siege of Yaroshalam by the Neo-Babylonians to the decree of Cyrus of Persia calling for the rebuilding of the temple in 519 BC (not 538 or 536) was a span of 70 years (2 Chronicles 36:21). Add 70 years to 4,641 years and we get 4,711 years. From the decree of Cyrus in 519 BC down to today has been a span of 2,538 years. Add 2,538 years to 4,711 years and we get 7,249 years from the first year of creation down to the year previous to this current one. From the first day of creation to the creation of Adam was five days since Adam was created on the sixth day of creation. We simply continue tallying up the number days based on the number of years in this fashion. The solar year, which is the time it takes for the sun to move from one point and return back to the same point is 365.24 days. Therefore, in the course of 7,249 years there have been 2,647,624 days from the first day of creation down to the Shabath day previous to the day I am writing this post. The figure 2,647,624 is evenly divisible by seven into 378,232 weeks of days. What this means is that today (March 24, 2021) has to be four days later than the previous Shabath day, and three days from now will be the next Shabath day (i.e. day 2,647,631), and so on. The way you find the correct Shabath day is by tallying up the total number of days since the first day of creation to the day you are doing the calculation, and then you divide the total by seven. If the resulting figure cannot be evenly divided by seven then the day you did the calculation is not the Shabath day.


Simple.

Now, even though the solar year is 365.24 days, we are commanded in Thorah to reckon a calendar year as 364 days because our year is divided into sevens, and there are 52 of them in a year. Thus, 52 x 7 = 364. Since a 364-day calendar is faster than the solar year by 1.24 days each year, if it is not adjusted periodically with leap years it will drift through all of the seasons of the solar year in 294 years, and that cannot be allowed to happen because the New Year must always occur in the spring. The solution is to add 52 weeks to the calendar in the course of 294 years. This system is attested in the Books of Kings and Chronicles when Shalamah (Solomon) dedicated the first temple. Every 294-year period contains 107,380 days (365.24 x 294). If you understand this and do the math, the previous year 7,249 ended as of this sunrise on March 24th, and the new year 7,250 commenced.



Not everyone may agree with this calendar, but anyone claiming to believe the Thorah and telling you it is not scriptural is incompetent, in all honesty, and does not know what they are talking about; or perhaps they do not believe the first six days of creation were literal days. Ask them how can a day lasting a thousand years contain only one "evening" (sunset) and only one "morning" (sunrise). Doesn't work. You either believe in Thorah or you don't. YA'OH made the heavens and the earth in six literal days, not six eras lasting 1,000+ years each. As of today the world is exactly 2,647,628 days old, and 7,250 years old. Simply math. His name is YA'OH Always has been. Always will be.

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